Home » Blog » Travel » Trips » Adventure Network International Sets Up Camp At The South Pole

Freeze Camp

Adventure Network International Sets Up Camp At The South Pole

Adventure-Network-International-LogoIn addition to the United States Antarctic Program’s presence at the South Pole with the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, other “non-governmental organizations” are also permitted to have a small presence at the pole. For these NGOs, there’s a very specific marked area that they’re allowed to camp in, and their access to the south pole station is limited. This season, Adventure Network International setup their south pole basecamp in support of incoming ANI expeditions – both ski expeditions, as well as tourist flights.

The ANI folks are great, and run a very solid operation. Their camp, while portable and temporary, is top notch, with sleeping facilities, a galley, bathrooms, and power generation. During their time here, I had the opportunity to meet a few of the camp staff members while giving them tours of the South Pole Station, and also got my own tour of their camp. A few pics of the ANI NGO Camp at the South Pole:

Approaching the NGO Camp Area from the south pole station – it’s about 1/2 mile away from the station.

2013-01-04 NGO Camp
2013-01-04 NGO Camp

ANI’s campsite, fully setup. You can see the main meeting and mess tent, as well as their supply tents.

2013-01-04 NGO Camp
2013-01-04 NGO Camp

Between tents are the solar power arrays, snow melter, and other equipment.

2013-01-04 NGO Camp

Camp staff sleeping quarters.

2013-01-04 NGO Camp

Inside the main tent, complete with galley, eating area, and heater. Actually quite comfy!

2013-01-04 NGO Camp
2013-01-04 NGO Camp

Find out more about ANI’s expeditions to the South Pole, as well as the rest of Antarctica on their website.

4 comments

  1. Keith Keber says:

    Why are the camp sleep tents so far away from the the larger community? Noise?

    Here in SE Wisconsin, we had terrible bitter cold winds last night (WNW, 50+ mph gusts) drove the wind chill temps to -16°F. I imagine the temperatures there are much colder. That makes me wonder: how are the tents constructed to keep out the cold and keep in the heat? Double-walled? What kind of heater is that? (I’m guessing kerosene).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *